Articles Tagged with Yahoo

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US Capitol BuildingThe US Government  responded yesterday to the FISC’s order to conduct a declassification review in the Yahoo case. Their response asks for 45 and 60 days to complete the full review. They cite the need for interagency coordination, the volume and type of materials, and multiple FOIA requests in support of this request.

In the Microsoft and Google cases, the Government asked for a third extension of its deadline to respond to Microsoft’s motion. Microsoft and Google both consented to the extension.

In other news about the FISA Court, Reggie B. Walton, the presiding judge, responded to Sen. Patrick Leahy’s request for more information about the court processes and procedures. On July 18, Sen. Leahy requested this information in preparation for a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the implementation of FISA Authorities (scheduled for July 31).


Posted in: Laws, Legal News

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During a recent trip to Washington, D.C., I discovered that the reflecting pool between the Lincoln Memorial and the National World War II Memorial had lost a bit of its luster. From inside the Lincoln Memorial, my gaze at the National Mall was interrupted by fencing, heavy equipment, and an empty pool.

However, an aerial view of Washington, D.C. from Google Maps provided no hint of the ongoing construction. So, based on some online research, I wanted to determine when the aerial photo used by Google was taken, as well as whether Google, Microsoft/Bing or Yahoo offered the most up-to-date maps.


Posted in: Technology

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Yahoo! Mail user Albert Rudgayzer sued the Silicon Valley web portal yesterday, charging that Yahoo’s revelation of users first and last names when they send email violates the portal’s own Terms of Service (‘TOS’), constituting a breach of contract. He seeks relief under federal and California state law.

Rudgayzer, a New York lawyer, alleges that he began using Yahoo email around October 2011. He filed the lawsuit in a pro se capacity in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California (read the lawsuit below).


Tagged: email, privacy, TOS, Yahoo

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us-supreme-court.jpgI found this photo of the U.S. Supreme Court on flickr, the photo-sharing website owned by Yahoo!. Sure, there are a lot of photos on flickr. However, this photo was uploaded by the Library of Congress. Is this the federal government’s entrée into social networking? What next? Barack, Hillary, John, Mitt and Mike “friending” us on Facebook? 😉 In all seriousness, this is a great step towards increasing the accessibility of our government resources. I find it so much easier to find photos on flickr than using the boolean search on the Library of Congress website. And, if you look very closely, you’ll only see 48 stars on the U.S. flag.


Posted in: Legal Research
Tagged: Yahoo

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Hi Friends,

SF Giants
I “skipped” work today and went to the SF Giants opener with Acendi Software CEO Charlie Moore (who took us all — thanks!!!!), one of my many attorneys Ruben Sundeen, bike photographer Kent Williams and Acendi team members (others were also going to home openers :). Charlie used to work with my previous attorneys at Venture Law Group (now part of Heller Erhman) and worked with Yahoo! and others when they were just starting out. The Giants lost by a touchdown, but it was nice day to talk code and Acendi’s new online forms service RocketLawyer.com, which allows users to create legal documents online. And I took a lot of Barry and Barry pictures (in the extended entry 🙂


Posted in: Justia News
Tagged: Yahoo

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Hi Friends,

We put up a Website with the new civil case filings in the US District Courts with links into Pacer for the full docket and filing information and News, Finance, Web and Blog Internet resources. The URL is: http://dockets.justia.com

It allows you to search and track when new cases are filed by State, Court, Lawsuit Type (eg Patent Law) or Party name… or any combination. We are updating this daily (but note the courts often post the filings a day or two after they are received).


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Lately, Google has been involved in a lot of lawsuits: book publishers, DOJ subpoena, Microsoft, France….

However, last month, in a novel twist, a plaintiff, Mark Anderson, convinced the Beverly Hills Small Claims Court to direct Google to remove a number of documents that mention him from the Google index, including newspaper articles and public documents such as a U.S. Bankruptcy Court order.

Specifically, the Court ordered Google to remove “all references to [1 individual and 3 companies] from the Google search engines and search results.” This is not the removal of the documents from the Internet, just from the Google search results. Attached to the order was an exhibit listing the Web pages to be removed from the Google index. Chilling Effects has posted the court order and exhibit on its Web site.


Posted in: Uncategorized

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The San Jose Mercury News reported that the Feds have subpoenaed Google in a bid to obtain their search records. In an act reminiscent of certain countries in “Old Europe,” Yahoo, Microsoft and AOL all surrendered, leaving Google to fight it alone.

Here are copies of the motions. I’ve OCR’d them so that they are searchable and copy-and-pasteable.


Posted in: Uncategorized

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Hi Friends,

Stacy and I went to the The Stanford Daily alumni dinner tonight following another Stanford loss to Cal (congrats RS). Thanks to Elna Tymes, whose son Adrian was one of the programmers at FindLaw, did a great job putting together the dinner.

As for the dinner talks, after going through the editorial and business metrics at the paper (happy to report that things are looking good :), former Knight Ridder columnist, book author and blogger Joanne Jacobs gave a talk on… blogs.


Posted in: Social Media

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Since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, I have been absolutely shocked by the magnitude of destruction left in her wake. In California, we’ve experienced our share of natural disasters, including the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989. While the damage from that earthquake was extensive, it did not force the evacuation of a major American city or disperse countless families into neighboring states away from their homes, possessions and careers. The manpower, resources and infrastructure needed to handle such a mass migration is unfathomable.

Hurricane Katrina also demonstrated the limitations of our current technologies. Once the power shuts down, the cellular phones go down as well. And, without a communication system in place, the process of contacting family members or coordinating relief efforts proves to be exponentially more challenging.

Fortunately, many Web sites have emerged in the past few days to help survivors reconnect with their family members. Let me share with you some Web sites that I’ve visited to keep up with Hurricane Katrina news.


Posted in: Legal Research