Articles Tagged with Steve Jobs

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Here is a rundown of October’s highest scoring lawyers on Justia Legal Answers, along with a look at which Onward blog and Facebook posts readers viewed the most.

Justia Legal Answers’ Top 10 Legal Answerers for October 2011

  1. Dennis Chen, 1,360 points, 28 answers
  2. Tanner Woods Pittman, 500 points, 10 answers
  3. Rodney John Alberto, 910 points, 21 answers
  4. Andrew Bresalier, 475 points, 17 answers
  5. David Philip Shapiro Esq., 450 points, 9 answers
  6. Paul Stanko, 400 points, 8 answers
  7. J. Richard Kulerski Esq., 300 points, 6 answers
  8. Evan Guthrie, 250 points, 5 answers
  9. Jennifer Doerrie, 200 points, 6 answers
  10. Lenore Tsakanikas, 200 points, 4 answers


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Here is a rundown of September’s highest scoring lawyers on Justia Legal Answers, along with a look at which Onward blog and Facebook posts readers viewed the most.

Justia Legal Answers’ Top 10 Legal Answerers for September 2011

  1. Jon Matthew Martinez, 850 points, 17 answers
  2. David Philip Shapiro, Esq., 500 points, 10 answers
  3. J. Richard Kulerski, Esq., 380 points, 8 answers
  4. Brian F. LaBovick Esq., 340 points, 8 answers
  5. Herbert G. Farber Esq., 326 points, 10 answers
  6. Andrew John Hawes, 280 points, 6 answers
  7. Anthony J. Pietrafesa, 280 points, 6 answers
  8. Mark A. Siesel, 250 points, 5 answers
  9. Robert Neal Katz, 250 points, 5 answers
  10. Mark Steven Humphreys, 200 points, 4 answers


Posted in: Justia News

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My first hands-on experience with a personal computer was when my parents brought home an Apple II Plus. That computer and its sibling, the Apple IIe, introduced our family to the unbounded world of word processing, spreadsheets and, of course, games. These computers also launched my lifelong appreciation of and affection for Apple products. From PowerBook to MacBook Pro, and iPod to iPhone and iPad, a pantheon of insanely great Apple products has delighted me over the years.


Posted in: Technology
Tagged: Apple, Steve Jobs

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Comedianssatirists, and Fake Steve’s everywhere, take note: under California’s new anti-Internet impersonation law, you want to make sure that you show your intent to tickle your reader’s funny bones on the Web.

That’s because under California Penal Code Section 528.5, someone who “knowingly and without consent” uses the Internet to “credibly impersonate[] another actual person” with the intent of “harming, intimidating, threatening, or defrauding another person is guilty of a misdemeanor.”

Some high-profile personalities and companies in California could put the new law through its paces in court. Here’s why.