Articles Tagged with Law School

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NY Board of Law ExaminersOn Friday, many law school graduates were eagerly waiting for their July 2010 New York Bar exam results.

The New York State Board of Law Examiners (‘BOLE’) promised law students that “the results of the July 2010 bar examination are being emailed to candidates beginning on November 5, 2010,” but warned candidates that there might be a delay of up to 24 hours before “your email system” would get them.

Any e-mail problems for the lawyers-in-waiting, however, paled in comparison to the results being posted online before they actually received them.  It’s sort of like you already know that your  significant other is going to propose to you, but you don’t know when.  Would you rather find out from him or her directly, or from Facebook first?


Posted in: Justia News, Legal News

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Harvard Law School, Photograph of front facade, Austin HallTimes have changed.  The legal job market now tilts in favor of law firms, not law school graduates.  Newly minted JDs are competing with laid-off associates who have years of experience, and are already admitted to the bar.

Some law schools have opted to subsidize their unemployed new graduates by either paying them or law firms, so that their JDs can garner relevant work experience in their new profession.

Here is a look at four law schools that subsidize unemployed graduates looking for work:


Posted in: Uncategorized

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Hi Friends,

Tom Bruce, Dan Nagy and Deborah Schaaf from the Legal Information Institute at Cornell Law School stopped on by for some meetings with folks on new free information projects. The LII gang met with us, Nolo, Stanford and FreeGovInfo.info 🙂 And there was a talk on privacy on the Internet with David Schellhase & Michael Blum moderated by Kevin Haroff. Here are some pictures of Tom in action making things happen…

Jake Warner and Tom Bruce


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Hi Friends,

Last week, the State of Oregon Legislative Counsel Committee sent Justia a notice of copyright infringement and demand to cease and desist. In its letter, Dexter Johnson, the Legislative Counsel, asked us to remove a copy of the Oregon Revised Statutes stored on our servers (or pay a licensing fee) by April 30, 2008. The letter claimed copyright on many parts of the Oregon Revised Statutes:

[T]he Committee … claim[s] a copyright in the arrangement and subject-matter compilation of Oregon statutory law, the prefatory and explanatory notes, the leadlines and numbering for each statutory section, the tables the index and annotations and such other incidents as are work product of the Committee in the compilation and publication of Oregon law.


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Hi Friends,

As public domain information hero Carl Malamud is working on getting case law online and into the public domain (we have helped a bit :). Carl, donors, and the Public.Resource.org team have done a lot and… more to come…

But in addition to case law, Carl has also been working to get other public legal documents online and into the public domain. These documents include the legislative histories of the laws. So this was interesting… it looks like Thomson-West has signed an exclusive agreement with the GAO to have these legislative histories on WestLaw.


Posted in: Legal Research

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Cornell Law Hi Friends,

One of the biggest forces in free online legal information, Tom Bruce, Director of the Legal Information Institute at Cornell Law School stopped by to meet with the gang at Justia. It was great talking through ideas about the future of legal information. We are going to do some work together on new fun projects which will benefit the populations of the Internets 🙂 It is going to be fantastic!!!

Tom Bruce at Stanford


Posted in: Legal Research

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Hi Friends,

First, here are the top ten law professor blogs as determined by vistors on .edu networks on BlawgSearch.com. I set this filter up for Professor J. Robert Brown, Jr. and a paper he was writing on blogs and reputation. You can read his post about it here. While most .edu visitors are not all law professors, they do seek out more academic blogs. Anyway here is the list.


Posted in: Social Media

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Hi Friends,

Here is a great new free case law project that came out (or at least I was made aware of 🙂 a few weeks ago. AltLaw.

Right now AltLaw is focused on getting up the Federal appellate opinions online (US Supreme Court and Federal Circuit Courts). They have aggregated opinions for the last 15 years or so (depending on the court), and have done good job presenting the cases in formated text, in addition to providing the original pdf and in a text only format. It looks like these are the slip opinions, but they can be later fixed up to match the text of the official published opinions.


Posted in: Legal Research

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Hi Friends,

This weeks featured Blawg on BlawgSearch.com is the Law Dawg Blawg from the great librarians at Southern Illinois University Law School.

The Law Dawg Blawg is full of great information and tips for legal researchers, as well as being a central online community setting for SIU Law School. But what makes the Law Dawg Blawg standout are the Law Dawgs. These are Dawgs of Law, who work with and and protect law students, legal librarians, lawyers and their families. Little Sheba the Hug Pug was a special guest law dawg last year!


Posted in: Uncategorized

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Hi Friends,

For those following the Floyd Landis arbitration at Pepperdine Law School… the blog to read is Trust But Verify — News, Research and Commentary About the Floyd Landis Doping Allegations — from David Brower. Pepperdine Law Professor Roger Alford also has some thoughts on witness tampering on Opinio Juris.
Trust But Verify – Floyd Landis Doping Allegations Blog

I am pretty sure Landis is going to lose anyway, but threatening Greg LeMond, and his buddy’s phone call… not good. The raw information before all of the 30 second media spin (but a lot of comments) are on Trust But Verify in the Hearing Coverage Section.


Posted in: Uncategorized