Articles Tagged with fastcase

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FastcaseLogoStandardA heads up that our friends at FastCase are about to launch the “Bad Law Bot” – or as they refer to it, their newest team member! No, this isn’t some evil case law robot sent to do us all harm from the future, but rather a cool enhancement to FastCase’s authority check feature. The Bad Law Bot algorithmically checks text within opinions for terms which connote a negative treatment (e.g., reversed, overruled) of an opinion and flags the corresponding citation for the user to view. The Bad Law Bot is a great new companion tool to use when cite checking. Great work FastCase!

You can check out more about the Bad Law Bot here:

Press Release

Ed Walters’ Video Announcement

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2010 was a busy legal year, especially for free law advocates.  Here are some of Justia’s legal predictions for 2011:

  • Lawyers and legal professionals will continue to embrace free law as fast as our Law.gov movement friends can crank it out.  Free law will continue its dramatic growth, and Justia remains proud to support the efforts of Carl Malamud’s work at Public.Resource.Org, along with Google, Fastcase, LII and other friends.
  • SCOTUS will grant certiorari after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit renders a decision either affirming or denying a lower court ruling that California’s ban against same-sex marriage is unconstitutional.
  • Immigration will become the ‘new abortion’ litmus test for politicians, as more states and localities try to assert jurisdiction over the federal government’s immigration authority.
  • Patent holding companies will continue providing a steady supply of litigation work for IP lawyers. Critics will unsuccesfully lobby Congress to overhaul the current U.S. Patent Act, as big bucks are spent on all sides of the debate.
  • The FTC will strongly push for a ‘do not e-mail registry’ similar to the FCC’s ‘Do-Not-Call’ list, but it won’t happen.
  • Consumer bankruptcies will continue to rise.
  • Foreclosure proceedings will slow dramatically, giving homeowners a welcome reprieve. Class actions will continue uncovering unlawful robo-signings, and ruin the reputations of a select number of lawyers and other firms representing banks in foreclosures.

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Last week marked the formal launch of a new Supreme Court of California resource center, SCOCAL (http://scocal.stanford.edu). SCOCAL is a joint project between Justia and our friends at the Robert Crown Law Library at Stanford and Fastcase. There are lots of cool features in the site and, as ever, I encourage all our readers who are interested in California law to spend some time checking it out. Below is a brief summary of what you’ll find when you visit the site.

California Supreme Court Opinions – Browse through the full text of recent opinions by date, name or issue, or search the entire collection, which includes decisions from 1934 to the present. Click on the tabs located at the top of each individual case to access related information and documents.

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Black Friday and Cyber Monday have come and gone, but there’s still time to get terrific gifts for lawyers and clients.  Here are some of our favs:

    iPad

  • The Apple iPad —  It’s sleek, small, and über cool. It holds nifty free legal apps like Fastcase to find state and federal statutes and cases and Oyez’s PocketJustice that let’s lawyers listen to Supreme Court oral arguments.  When your attorney friend is done raging at opposing counsel’s latest outrageous offer to their client, the attorney can vent his or her anger by playing Angry Birds or Star Wars Falcon Gunner. Plus, it makes them (and everyone they meet) think that they’re a swell lawyer, right?
  • Adopt a Volume of the Federal Reporter — No, we’re not crazy (at least not all the time)!  For $1,200, you can actually make a tax-deductible donation to Public.Resource.Org to support scanning a volume or two of the first series of the Federal Reporter of the United States in the name of your favorite lawyer or law firm.  The donation is to help them “adopt” a volume of federal case law  from 1880 – 1924 that is now in the public domain.
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'The Fastcase App for your iPad

Do you like free, quick access to case law and codes? Of course you do. What’s not to like?

With an iPad or iPhone, you can download the free Fastcase app to research state and federal court opinions, as well as find state and federal codes.

That’s right, it costs you and your firm nothing. Nada. Rien. Zilch. You pay nothing to get it, and nothing to use it. No other legal app out there gives lawyers and legal professionals this much portable legal research, convenience, and speed for virtually nothing.

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